Learn English – the opposite of ‘identity’ in this case

antonymssingle-word-requests

I am looking for a word that describes the exact opposite of identity.

I have this sentence that says The identity operator returns true if the operands are strictly equal.

In other terms is there a word for not strictly equal / strictly unequal?

There is an operator that does the opposite: The opposite word operator returns true if the operands are strictly unequal.

I tried to google the antonyms and such, but none of the proposed words match or satisfy this case in my opinion. Or did you see or do you think one them could be used?

  • difference
  • dissimilarity
  • opposite
  • non-identity
  • other suggestions?

Definitions for this case:

equal – only very few characteristics cannot be in common.

strictly equal – all characteristics are in common.

unequal – only very few characteristics can be in common.

not strictly equal – none of the characteristics are in common.

I don't want it to be a Math question. They use symbols not words.

Best Answer

As a coder, when I think of an "identity operator" I put it into coding terms where there might, for example, be an associated truth table that identifies how it is evaluated.

and, in most coding languages, there is a Negation operator that can be combined with it to show indicate the opposite usage. The obvious example in most languages being equal "=" versus Not equal "!=". where the exclamation point indicates that the associated truth table for this expression must the opposite.

I'm not sure I've ever seen a single operator that implies "NOT identity", so if you have created one - congratulations! you get to name it.

Hmmm.... the disparity operator?

And at that, I sure wouldn't want to have to have the debate on exactly what percentage of characteristics have to differ before you flip from equal to unequal. And are the characteristics weighted as to their importance in determining when something ceases to be equal? Writing precise definitions without precise meanings (exactly how many is "a few"?) is a tough thing to do!